Baz MANNING

manning-jbe-arms
ArmsOr semy of millrinds Azure, a chief dancetty of two full points upwards purpure pierced twice of the field billetwise throughout.
CrestUpon a mount growing therefrom Giant Red Paintbrushes (castilleja miniata) slipped and leaved proper an heraldic antelope statant erect per fess dancetty gules and purpure armed tufted unglued and winged Or.
MottoSINE QUA NON (Without this nought).

Mr Manning’s artistic career is symbolised throughout the achievement. The field is based on the arms of Lincoln’s Inn, his first major client, with the tinctures reversed and the purple of its lion colouring the chief and crest. The chief represents a portion of a raised portcullis, the first example of this in heraldry. This symbolises Mr Manning’s two most important clients, the House of Lord, where he paints the heraldry on the inside walls, and Windsor Castle, where he has painted the Garter Knight’s shields since the restoration of St George’s Chapel. Mr Manning is descended from the first Baron Cloncurry on his mother’s side, whose arms are remembered in the chief and the escutcheon in the crest. The antelope is a direct reference to heraldry, holding a white shield as the symbol of the heraldic artist and shield maker with a blank shield ready for painting. It is winged as a reference to Mr Manning’s time in the RAF and a lifelong interest in aviation. It stands in a bed of paintbrush flowers which area a new plant or British heraldry, only once being used before in a Canadian corporate grant. These are an obvious reference to a life of painting and a more subtle one to commemorate – Robert Watt’s request – his attendance at the Artists’ Workshop of the Ottawa Heraldry Congress of 1996; the giant red paintbrush being a North American wildflower.

Granted30th December 2000 (College of Arms)
AgentRobert Noel (Lancaster Herald)
Located in: Members
Powered by SobiPro